Blog

Biography
  • The Role of the Artist

    "The function of art is to give us an existential experience. In his music, painting, sculpture, and poetry we feel, we experience, and we respond. It is not an intellectual exercise. The highest moment of our lives, those of love and tragedy, are matters of the heart, of feeling. They are experiential. The pity of much modern life is that we do not know how to experience either love or tragedy. We are alienated from each other, and from our real selves. " 

    This is a quote from Rabbi Levi Olan in 1968 in a radio address he gave.

    I found it both inspiring and immensely insightful. 

    I painted this image at a time I was experiences great sorrow and anxiety, and Olan's quote reminded me of it.

  • The Stages of an Artist: Video

    I decided to make 'Stages of an Artist' when a friend recently asked me to show how my art has developed over time.

    This video is a way to answer that question. It is a chronological view of selected paintings to illustrate how my paintings have changed and evolved from about the year 2000 to present.

    Click the double arrows under the video to enlarge to full screen.

  • My Life As An Artist

    my life as an artist

    It all probably started in kindergarten when I liked to experiment with different color combinations. Like I noticed grey and pink or red and tan looked really good together. Lots of people ask me how long I have been painting.  Sometimes I say about "10 or 12 years, as a serious artist." Sometimes I say "all my life-- on and off."

    Being an artist is hard to define. People who are good at putting on make-up are nowadays are called artists. Who am I to argue?

     

    But back to my personal history.

     

    I am starting this blog as an addition to my web site and thought it would be a good time to introduce myself officially, as an Artist, with a capital A, to my friends, collectors, other artists, viewers, galleries and anyone else who stumbles onto my web site.

     

    So here goes.

     

    After kindergarten, I have to give my parents a lot of credit for bringing out the artist in me. They noticed that I liked to draw and paint and encouraged my activities. One of my most vivid memories is when I was about 10 years old my parents took me to Greenwich Village in New York City with them. They took me to an art supply store and bought me a real artists box, with oil paints and brushes. This left an indelible memory--and message--they thought of me as an artist. It was quite a vote of confidence for a 10 year old.

     

    In those years I never thought of myself as an artist, in spite of lots of lessons and encouragement from my parents.

     

    And, I hate to admit it, but I dropped the whole endeavor for about 10 years until after college.

     

    When I was first married and had young children, painting became a great hobby which I enjoyed a lot. I took lessons and made many paintings, some of which I am still proud of.

     

    Then life took another big turn:  divorce and law school and business career took my time and energy. There were years when I did nothing at all in terms of art. There were years when I managed to fit in a class or two. And sometimes I was able to paint on my own for a few hours on a Sunday afternoon.

     

    I experimented with different mediums--oil, acrylic, watercolors, collage--and continued to try to keep my creative juices flowing. Art was a part time hobby at best.

     

    Then in 1996 I retired from the world of work. With lots of free time for the first time in many years I decided to take up painting seriously.

     

    I began painting a on regular schedule at my home studio. I began going to extended workshops. I joined artist groups. And began to think of myself as an Artist.

     

    I would like to think that over the last dozen years or so my art evolved and developed. Today painting is definitely a part of my identity--when I think of who I am as person--Artist is on that list.

     

    My life as an Artist today? I paint at a studio several days a week. Join discussion groups with other artist. Keep up with the gallery scene, here in Dallas at some wonderful galleries like www.conduitgallery.com/ www.craigheadgreen.com/ and  http://www.ilumegallerie.com/ and http://www.kittrellriffkind.com/exhibitions.php. Another favorite is www.marytomas.com/studiogallery/.   On my travels to Austin, Santa Fe, Los Angeles, Denver, New York and Paris its always fun to check out the local art scene.

     

    Sometimes I am lucky enough to have a show like the one at  www.haleyhenman.com/ Or be part of a group exhibition at the Texas Visual Artists Association, tvaa.org/ . Or get accepted into a competition or magazine like  Studio City Magazine, www.studiovisitmagazine.com/

     

    I can truly say being an Artist, with a capital A, is fun and rewarding. It keeps me invigorated.

     

    To contact Esther Ritz to view or purchase her art, visit the contact page and get in touch.

  • Esther Ritz Short Biography

    esther ritz bio dallas artist

    Esther Ritz, born New York City, has been working as a painter in Dallas and Santa Fe for the last 12 years. She is a lifelong painter, mostly self educated, but has studied at intensive workshops with French and American master painters.

     

    She is represented by the Haley-Henman Gallery in Dallas, and has had 2 solo shows under their sponsorship, as well as participated in their group shows.

     

    She has also had a solo show in Santa Fe at the Read Johnson Gallery.

     

    In addition she has shown at numerous local venues such as the McKinney Avenue Contemporary, Bath House Cultural Center, AlSo Gallery, 500X and many of the TVAA group shows. She has been selected to participate in 3 TVAA Citation Juried National Shows and the Creative Arts Center juried show in 2011.

     

    In 2010 her work was juried and selected to be in the national magazine Studio Visit.

     

    Her numerous corporate and individual collectors are found throughout the U.S.